Arizona Digital Free Press - Logo

Shoeleather Journalism in the Digital Age

Shoeleather Journalism
in the Digital Age

HonorHealth: Well, hello there spring — allergies that is

Photo of HonorHealth
HonorHealth medical experts say treatment options may include allergy shots — especially if patients have side effects from over-the-counter medications or other medical issues that may create complications. (File Photos/DigitalFreePress)

HonorHealth offers top tips to conquer the 2024 Arizona allergy season

Sponsored Content | Digital Free Press

Hello spring — allergies that is.

Spring weather and spring flowers — it’s a wonderful time to be in the Valley, unless you are one of the roughly 25% of Americans who suffer from seasonal allergies according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“April Fool’s Day is typically the worst allergy day in Arizona,” says Julie Wendt, MD, an allergist and independent member of the HonorHealth Medical Staff. She’s board-certified in allergy and immunology and is the past president of the Arizona Allergy and Asthma Society.

“Patients frequently ask me, ‘What is the green tree with the yellow leaves?'” Dr. Wendt says. “That’s the palo verde tree and one of the Valley’s most common allergy culprits.”

With plenty of spring rain, you may think your allergies will be worse this year. Dr. Wendt says they will, but maybe not right away.

Rain can help reduce pollen in the air, but the moisture left in the ground can make things worse in the fall. Symptoms like a runny nose, sneezing, and an itchy or scratchy sore throat are no fun, but is it allergies or a cold?

Dr. Wendt says if you have symptoms every year at the same time, it’s probably allergies. If they come and go with no pattern, it may be a cold or the flu. Colds may have associated aches and pains, fatigue and chest discomfort. If it’s the flu, you may also have a fever.

If you think it’s allergies, she recommends limiting your time outside, keeping your doors and windows closed, using HEPA air filters and changing them frequently, and don’t forget about your four-legged friends.

“Use baby wipes on your pet’s fur and keep them off your bed,” Dr. Wendt added. “The baby wipes can help remove allergens such as pet dander or pollen from their fur.”

Above is Dr. Julie A. Wendt, who is an allergist at HonorHealth. (File Photos/DigitalFreePress)
HonorHealth offers top tips to conquer the 2024 Arizona allergy season

If you’re still sniffling and sneezing, over-the-counter remedies like nose sprays, eyedrops,
decongestants and antihistamines can help, but read the labels first.

If you have questions, call your doctor’s office or schedule a quick virtual visit. If you don’t see improvements, Dr. Wendt recommends visiting a board-certified allergist.

“We hold double certifications in either internal medicine or pediatrics, as well as allergy/immunology and are up to date on the latest research and treatment options.”

Treatment options may include allergy shots, especially if you have side effects from
over-the-counter medications or other medical issues that may create complications.

“If shots are the best answer to treat your symptoms, your allergist will work with you to get your allergies into remission, this takes about three to five years,” Wendt said. “Allergy shots are about 85 to 90% effective and can really help people that are struggling.”

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Learn About the Author

Cover_Spring 2024 SUSD Showcase magazine
Experience Scottsdale AD